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07 June 2019

Rustenburg – Cold and flu fighting hints from Doctor Cornelia Geldenhuys could help to keep you healthy this winter.


As the weather gets colder, colds and flu seem to spread. “Common colds are the main reason that children miss school and adults are absent from work,” says doctor Geldenhuys. 

“First and foremost, it starts with a healthy diet. Make sure that you eat enough fruit and vegetables so that your body has the necessary vitamins to keep the flu at bay.

I would also advise that you make sure that you are always dressed warmly.”


Doctor Geldenhuys also advised to make sure you get enough vitamin C to boost your immune system and wash your hands frequently. “I always make sure to take vitamins during the winter to make sure that my body has the necessary strength to fight off infections.” 


Instead of coughing into your hand, cough into your arm or away from other people to avoid spreading germs. 


Regarding other preventive measures, Medhuys nurse Sheila Strydom said: “Flu vaccinations are very helpful – especially for the young and elderly.” Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body.

These antibodies provide protection against infections from the viruses that are in the vaccine. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses.


The common cold lasts about three days before you start to get better and over-the-counter medicine should be sufficient. Symptoms may very but the usual signs are:

 

  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • Congestion
  • Slight body aches or a mild headache
  • Sneezing
  • Low-grade fever
  • Generally feeling unwell (malaise)


If all these symptoms appear at the same time and you a high fever, it is better to go and see a medical practioner within the first 48-hours to prescribe anti-viral medication. It is vital that you take the necessary medicine within this timeframe.


If a cold is not treated in time, it can develop into something serious like pneumonia and bronchitis where a medical practitioner could prescribe antibiotics.

Medhuys nurse Sheila Strydom taking Mari Geldenhuys and Braam Geldenhuys’s temperature.
Doctor Cornelia Geldenhuys

 

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